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Quit smoking, gain weight: Is it inevitable?

Is weight gain inevitable after you quit smoking? What causes it?

It's fairly common to gain weight after you stop smoking, especially in the first few months but it isn't inevitable.

Smoking acts as an appetite suppressant and may slightly increase your metabolism as well. When you quit smoking, your appetite and metabolism return to normal which may lead you to eat more and burn fewer calories. Also, your ability to smell and taste food improves after you quit smoking. This can make food more appealing, which may lead you to eat more. And if you substitute snacking for smoking, the calories may quickly add up.

To avoid weight gain when you quit smoking, make diet and exercise part of your stop-smoking plan. It may help to:

  • Get moving. Include physical activity in your daily routine. Regular exercise not only burns calories but also helps relieve withdrawal symptoms and cravings.
  • Make wise food choices. Plan good-for-you meals that include plenty of fruits and vegetables. Eat smaller portions. Limit sweets and alcohol.
  • Choose healthy snacks. If you're hungry between meals, opt for snacks such as fresh fruit or canned fruit packed in its own juices, low-fat air-popped popcorn or fat-free yogurt.

Above all, remember that the health benefits of being smoke-free far exceed the problems associated with even moderate weight gain.

Updated: 10/13/2010

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